Tie on Baggage Labels.

Posted on 14/04/2019 By

Tie on Baggage Labels.

Tie on Baggage Labels: Bertie (left) and Trevor, with Betty Boop peeping inbetween!

Bertie: “Watcha Trev! How’s things? You’ve been a bit quiet lately!”

Trevor: “Bertie… I have told you before. Kindly use my proper name… Trevor. I may appear quiet but, quite honestly, so do most people when in the company of you and Bobby.”

Bertie: “Oooohh err. You are so sensitive. How about doing a story next week?”

Trevor: “That would be most agreeable, Bertie. But, as you will remember, my preference is nostalgia and Bobby’s fascinating childhood. A true schoolboy, growing up in the 1950s. We last wrote about airline sticky labels. It seems that many enjoyed the beautifully presented “stickies” for airline travel back in the 1950s. They were the advertising, ‘Look at me and see where I have been’. Lovely graphics from a bygone age.

But then, there were the ‘tie on’ versions. These were the business end of luggage dispatch. In a world where computers had not been invented. Printed on card and double sided, they had their own place in the manic world of Bobby’s schoolboy collecting. There were far fewer airliners then and only the well off could afford to fly at all. Some of these tie on baggage labels were collected from sources beyond Bobby’s memory. Mostly though from LAP (London Airport), Heathrow now. A fourteen year old schoolboy sneaking around the luggage dispatch areas with sticky fingers. There are quite a lot and I will restrict them to a few to give you the idea… As before, for added interest we have researched the airliners of the day that would have carried such luggage and passengers.”

Tie on Baggage Labels: “IDL” stands for Idlewild . New York’s airport that was later renamed John F Kennedy in 1963.

“IDL” stands for Idlewild . New York’s airport that was later renamed John F Kennedy in 1963.

Tie on Baggage Labels:

 

Boeing 377 Stratocruiser, which had its origins in the B29 Superfortress wartime bomber.

Boeing 377 Stratocruiser, which had its origins in the B29 Superfortress wartime bomber.

Tie on Baggage Labels:

Tie on Baggage Labels:

Lockheed L749A Constellation.

Lockheed L749A Constellation.

Tie on Baggage Labels:

Tie on Baggage Labels:

Sud Aviation SE210 Caravelle. The first airliner to have engines placed on the rear fuselage.

Sud Aviation SE210 Caravelle. The first airliner to have engines placed on the rear fuselage.

Tie on Baggage Labels:

Tie on Baggage Labels:

Douglas DC7C. The last piston engined airliner before the advent of jets.

Douglas DC7C. The last piston engined airliner before the advent of jets.

Tie on Baggage Labels:

Tie on Baggage Labels:

Lockheed L749A Constellation.

Lockheed L749A Constellation.

Tie on Baggage Labels:

Tie on Baggage Labels:

Avro York. Derived from the Lancaster bomber.

Avro York. Derived from the Lancaster bomber.

Tie on Baggage Labels:

Tie on Baggage Labels:

Tie on Baggage Labels:

The wonderful De Havilland Comet.

The wonderful De Havilland Comet.

This the last version, the Comet 4, that corrected all the fallibility of the original Comet. The one that had a number of fatal crashes. By the time this came into service, it was too late and the Americans had taken the market with their larger jets. The Boeing 707 and Douglas DC8.

Cabin Luggage Labels.

Tie on Baggage Labels:

Convair 440 Metropolitan.

Convair 440 Metropolitan.

Tie on Baggage Labels:

Tie on Baggage Labels:

Tie on Baggage Labels:

Tie on Baggage Labels:

Tie on Baggage Labels:

Tie on Baggage Labels:

Tie on Baggage Labels:

Tie on Baggage Labels:

Tie on Baggage Labels:

Convair 440 Metropolitan.

Convair 440 Metropolitan.

Tie on Baggage Labels:

Tie on Baggage Labels:

Lighting a Candle for Diddley.

Lighting a Candle for Diddley: The Vickers Viscount. First airliner that Bobby flew in.

The Vickers Viscount. First airliner that Bobby flew in.

Trevor's Stickies    


  1. Avatar Jim Allen says:

    Very nice sample of your collection, Bobbie. Mine is of beer mats, mats from all over Europe, Great Britain, and North America.

    Cheers, Jim

  2. Avatar Phil Barnett says:

    The first plane I flew in was a De Haviland Comet owned by Dan Air (remember them?). That was back in 1974. London Gatwick to Bastia in Corsica. A wonderful holiday and I fell in love with Corsica.

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